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3 Pregnancy Myths You Shouldn't Believe

3 Pregnancy Myths You Shouldn't Believe


3 Pregnancy Myths You Shouldn't Believe

When you find out you're pregnant your thoughts often turn quickly from excitement to wondering what kind of 9-month journey you're in for. You may have heard that closely-timed pregnancies result in less morning sickness or that carrying a girl will result in more. But is there really any truth to these myths?

 We looked at three of the most common beliefs about moms and their pregnancies and reviewed hundreds of Circle of Moms members' comments to figure out which, if any of them hold up.

1. Do Closely-timed Pregnancies Trump Morning Sickness?

Morning sickness is a symptom of pregnancy that everyone wants to avoid, and few do. Circle of Moms member Shavaune C. swears that if you have two pregnancies very close together, the second pregnancy will be much easier, virtually symptom-free. Her reasoning is that your body is already accustomed to pregnancy hormones, and therefore will require little adjustment. Jade B.'s experience echoes this: after enduring tremendous morning sickness, swollen breasts, and severe mood swings when she was pregnant with her son a little more than a year ago, she's now halfway through her second pregnancy and has had virtually no symptoms

 

On the other hand, many Circle of Moms members report exactly the opposite experience. Cathy L.'s two pregnancies, also close together, were almost identical in nature: she had clear skin, little weight gain, and mild and infrequent morning sickness. Cassandra S.'s first pregnancy was like a non-event; she barely even knew she was pregnant. But the second time around she was sick almost constantly for the first few months, and was so tired she could barely function.

2. Can Dietary Changes Create a "Symptomless" Pregnancy?

While symptomless pregnancies aren't rare, they're somewhat uncommon so much so that Jade B. thought there was something wrong when she didn't experience swollen breasts, nausea, or tiredness. But it turns out that she had a perfectly normal pregnancy, and now has a healthy son. Serenity C. could not even feel her contractions during labor, though the fetal monitor was registering them. (Now there's a accomplishment many of us would like to learn how to achieve!) 

Some women claim that what you eat influences whether or not you will have a relatively symptom-free pregnancy. Nancy T. says that eating spicy Thai food and regularly monitoring her blood sugar caused her to experience very few symptoms throughout her pregnancy. And Sara B.'s constant citrus cravings kept morning sickness, and all other potential symptoms, at bay.

But spicy food of any kind gives many pregnant women severe heartburn, and citrus made Corinne T. so nauseous she couldn't even stand the smell of orange juice.

 

3. Do Girls Make for Harder Pregnancies and Less "Glow"?

Some of the popular myths about gender and pregnancy are that you won't have as much morning sickness with a boy, and that with a girl, it can be severe. It's also often said that women pregnant with girls don't "glow" as much as those pregnant with boys, because a girl baby "steals the mother's beauty."

Circle of Moms member Charity T.'s pregnancies suggest that the first myth, that girls make for tougher pregnancies, is pure bunk: She wasn't sick at all with her boy, and was extremely sick with her next baby, a girl. Elizabeth B.'s three pregnancies were an unpredictable grab bag of experience. With her first two (a girl and then a boy) she was sick for much of the first trimester. With her third, a girl, she had almost no symptoms at all. And she can't think of anything that might account for these differences.

As far as skin and beauty go, Rachael H., who has never had problematic skin, had terrible outbreaks during both of her pregnancies both boys. Perhaps they were trying to steal their mother's looks?

These moms' reports suggest that trying to predict what a pregnancy might be like is, well, pure folly! Each mom, and each pregnancy, is unique. The most we can do is hope for the best, and roll with whatever come our way.

Image Source: Courtesy of Molly Darling via Flickr/Creative Commons

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of, and should not be attributed to, POPSUGAR.

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