Apps For Tracking Homework

8 Apps to Help Manage Their Homework Load

You may check your child’s homework daily, but how is he keeping track of what’s due when and for which class? Check out these great apps to help him not only manage his homework schedule, but to help him with reference materials, too.

1. My Gradebook

This app combines keeping track of assignments with keeping track of how well your child is doing in his classes. The fully customizable interface allows your child to enter information about all of his classes, add, color code, and keep track of assignments.

Your child can also indicate what type of grading system (percentage or points-based) is used in each class, so when he enters in the grades for each assignment, My Gradebook ($1) will be able to show him exactly how well he’s doing.

2. iProcrastinate

You’d think an app with procrastinate right in the name might not be one you want your child to be using, but this app is not only a fantastic task manager, but also helpful for kids who need to break tasks into manageable chunks.

The iProcrastinate (free) interface easily allows for creation of step-by-step directions for completing an assignment. Your child can input her ToDo list, set recurring tasks, and mark things as “Due Today,” “Upcoming,” or “Overdue.” Even cooler, the app can be synced to your child’s Apple computer, DropBox, or iCloud accounts.

Keep reading for more apps to help deal with homework assignments.

3. iHomework

The iHomework app ($2) is more of an electronic day planner than it is an assignment tracker. While your child can certainly keep up to date on all of his homework assignments, he can also have his schedule, teacher and student contact information, and even his reading list right at his fingertips. You can also set pop-up reminders for the more forgetful child, and iHomework has in-app access to the online research site.

4. SparkNotes

For those of us old enough to remember the distinctive yellow and black CliffsNotes booklets, the concept of SparkNotes (free) is not new. What is new, though, is that the study guides for literature, plays, and poetry are now available digitally.

Your child can not only access nearly 50 preinstalled study guides, but also start a virtual study group. SparkNotes even has a feature that allows her to share what she’s studying as a Facebook status, though that may be counterproductive to studying.

5. Dictionary and Thesaurus

This premium app from Dictionary.com not only has a common dictionary, but also has medical and science dictionaries, too. Dictionary and Thesaurus ($3) does not require internet access to work, which is a bonus if you have a kid who is easily distracted by the Web. It also allows your child to have a “favorite” word list, hear words said out loud, see them used in sentences, discover word origins, and has a fun “Word of the Day” feature.

6. iFormulas

If your child is taking an advanced math or science course this year, she’ll need to know formulas — or at least know where to find them. Instead of searching through a textbook or on the Web, she can simply turn to the iFormulas app (free).

The app has libraries of formulas commonly used in algebra, calculus, chemistry, geometry, electrical engineering, trigonometry, and physics. Be aware, though, the app merely provides the correct format; she’ll have to solve the equations herself!

7. Calc Pro

If your child is going to be solving those equations, she’s going to need a good calculator at her side. The Calc Pro ($8) app is a good alternative to buying an expensive scientific calculator. It actually gives your child 10 different types of calculators at her fingertips, ranging from basic calculators to more complex ones, like financial, scientific, statistical, and graphing calculators.  

8. Quick Periodic Table of the Elements

I had no idea how much information there was to learn about the elements until I started looking at the Quick Periodic Table of the Elements app (free). The app has four separate periodic tables to help you look at elements by group, class, representative elements, or orbital blocks. For the less chemistry-inclined (like me) it also has a search function that breaks each element down by symbol, number, and name. And if that’s not enough info, your child can take an in-app peek at the Wikipedia entry for individual elements.

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