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How to Handle the 3 Top Birthday Party Fears


How to Handle the 3 Top Birthday Party Fears

Even with the abundance of creative blueprints for great kids' birthday parties out there, for some of us, planning a birthday party is always going to be anxiety-provoking. It's not necessarily because we don’t know how to do it; it's because we don’t want to be doing it at all!

If the thought of throwing a party for your child's approaching birthday makes you tense, here is some sage advice from Circle of Moms members on how to handle three common birthday party concerns.

1. Your Child Doesn't Have Friends to Invite

Julia P. worries about her kids not having friends to invite to a party. She’s a military mom who lives off-post and moves a lot, which means she and her preschoolers have yet to make friends in their new home.

If your child doesn't have many friends to invite to a party, for whatever reason, several moms suggest sparing your him the discomfort of a poorly attended event and making it a day just for him instead. After Kim H.’s family moved, they celebrated by picking an activity just for the birthday boy: "The entire day was for [him] and even though it was just family, the kids had a very special day," she shares.

2. Noone Will Come

Other moms worry whether anyone will come to their child’s party, and for some it’s a realistic fear. Kristin R. dreads throwing her son a birthday party. Although she invites his whole class, she knows attendance will be sparse and her son will have trouble getting along with the other kids. He has ADHD and Asperger Syndrome, which complicates his efforts to make friends. Another Circle of Moms member, Michelle M., invited all 22 of her son’s preschool classmates to his party and only one parent responded. When the day rolled around she was at a loss to ease his disappointment.

 

The lack of RSVPs is often more likely due to bad manners than bad intentions, say several of our members. Still, more than one suggests that moms in Michelle's situation give the parents a call or catch them in the school parking lot to check in before the party.

Beth G. also suggests a backup plan: invite cousins. Remember, too, she says, to emphasize that it’s not the number of kids who come, it’s the fun they have together.

3. Your Child's Birthday Falls on a Holiday or During Summer

Finally, some parents have to grapple with birthdays that fall at awkward times. A member named Laura has trouble getting responses for her son’s July birthday parties, even when she sends out the invitations before school breaks for the summer! Australian mom Lisa R. can relate. Her son’s birthday not only falls during their summer holiday, but right around Christmas, too, which makes birthday planning really hard.

Michelle L. points out you don’t have to stick with inviting school friends or even a traditional party. Her sons are content with inviting a couple of kids from the neighborhood to do something special, like go to the movies or a water park.

Kay K. solved the summer birthday problem in her house by having her son’s party on the last day of school and celebrating his actual birthday with family.

In the end, as Kristin R. concludes, a big birthday party isn't actually the best way to celebrate, as it just puts pressure on both mother and child. All that really matters is that your child feels special on his birthday.

 

 

 

Image Source: Getty/Darrin Klimek

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of, and should not be attributed to, POPSUGAR.

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